Location

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Student Center Theatre and Twilight Ballroom

Start Date

16-4-2019 4:00 PM

End Date

16-4-2019 7:30 PM

Description

Shooting accuracy in basketball is key to winning games. While there are various factors as to why a team either makes or misses their shots, the intensity of play is likely a contributing factor. A player who has played the majority of the game would likely have a higher, more intense heart rate (HR). Depending on the athlete, this could impact shooting accuracy. Examining the relationship between HR intensity and shooting accuracy has not been looked at in a real game setting before. Therefore, we set out to determine the impact heart rate intensity has on shooting accuracy in a game setting.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of heart rate intensity on shooting accuracy in a game setting in NCAA Division I female basketball players.

Methods: We examined the team stats for shooting accuracy from overall attempts, three point attempts, and free throws during five games. During games players wore HR monitors that transmitted to a mobile app that displayed their HR in real time. Every time a shot was attempted, we recorded what kind of shot, where on the floor it came from, whether it was made or missed, and the HR zone that the athlete was at when it took place. The HR zones that were compared were 1) 70-80% HR max, 2) 80-90% HR max, and 3) 90-100% HR max. These data were input into a spreadsheet to calculate the average team shooting percentage across these three HR zones for overall shooting, free throws, and 3-pointers.

Results: As indicated in the table, the team shooting percentage was highest for all types of shooting when players were at the lowest HR intensity. Shooting accuracy declined at higher HR intensities.

Comments

James I. Perkins College of Education

Top Scholar

James Hutson, Casey Pederson, and Courtney Elliott

Impact of Heart Rate Intensity on Shooting Accuracy during Games in NCAA Division I Women Basketball Players

Faculty Sponsor: Dustin Joubert (Kinesiology and Health Science)

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Apr 16th, 4:00 PM Apr 16th, 7:30 PM

Impact of Heart Rate Intensity on Shooting Accuracy during Games in NCAA Division I Women Basketball Players

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Student Center Theatre and Twilight Ballroom

Shooting accuracy in basketball is key to winning games. While there are various factors as to why a team either makes or misses their shots, the intensity of play is likely a contributing factor. A player who has played the majority of the game would likely have a higher, more intense heart rate (HR). Depending on the athlete, this could impact shooting accuracy. Examining the relationship between HR intensity and shooting accuracy has not been looked at in a real game setting before. Therefore, we set out to determine the impact heart rate intensity has on shooting accuracy in a game setting.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of heart rate intensity on shooting accuracy in a game setting in NCAA Division I female basketball players.

Methods: We examined the team stats for shooting accuracy from overall attempts, three point attempts, and free throws during five games. During games players wore HR monitors that transmitted to a mobile app that displayed their HR in real time. Every time a shot was attempted, we recorded what kind of shot, where on the floor it came from, whether it was made or missed, and the HR zone that the athlete was at when it took place. The HR zones that were compared were 1) 70-80% HR max, 2) 80-90% HR max, and 3) 90-100% HR max. These data were input into a spreadsheet to calculate the average team shooting percentage across these three HR zones for overall shooting, free throws, and 3-pointers.

Results: As indicated in the table, the team shooting percentage was highest for all types of shooting when players were at the lowest HR intensity. Shooting accuracy declined at higher HR intensities.