Event Title

Removable Discontinuity: CRISPR, Gene Drives, and Bioethics

Presenter Information

Emily Dunnahoe, Tyler Junior College

Start Date

18-4-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

18-4-2017 7:30 PM

Description

This paper questions whether bioethical scrutiny has been devoted to the ethical dilemmas that have arisen with advancements of CRISPR-Cas 9 gene editing techniques, particularly its use in conjunction with gene drive applications. Therefore, the trend of genetic research using both gene drives and CRISPR-Cas 9 systems must be established, while also simultaneously observing the trend of bioethical scholarly works. The tabulation of all articles from 2012 to 2015 from selected genetic journals yielded a significant increase in articles relating to CRISPR, while no articles were found in their selected bioethical counterparts for the same period. Similarly, no significant CRISPR/gene drive research was reported in selected journals during the specified period in either field of study. To demonstrate trends outside of bioethical scholarship, a secondary keyword analysis detailed an increase in articles devoted to exploring the ethical implications of CRISPR in all fields, yet without additional research outside of the scope of this paper, no conclusions can be made. In light of the profound impact of CRISPR-Cas 9 research, the scientific and the ethical concerns of society must be on the same page to ensure continuous progress.

Comments

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Betsy Ott (Tyler Junior College)

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Apr 18th, 4:00 PM Apr 18th, 7:30 PM

Removable Discontinuity: CRISPR, Gene Drives, and Bioethics

This paper questions whether bioethical scrutiny has been devoted to the ethical dilemmas that have arisen with advancements of CRISPR-Cas 9 gene editing techniques, particularly its use in conjunction with gene drive applications. Therefore, the trend of genetic research using both gene drives and CRISPR-Cas 9 systems must be established, while also simultaneously observing the trend of bioethical scholarly works. The tabulation of all articles from 2012 to 2015 from selected genetic journals yielded a significant increase in articles relating to CRISPR, while no articles were found in their selected bioethical counterparts for the same period. Similarly, no significant CRISPR/gene drive research was reported in selected journals during the specified period in either field of study. To demonstrate trends outside of bioethical scholarship, a secondary keyword analysis detailed an increase in articles devoted to exploring the ethical implications of CRISPR in all fields, yet without additional research outside of the scope of this paper, no conclusions can be made. In light of the profound impact of CRISPR-Cas 9 research, the scientific and the ethical concerns of society must be on the same page to ensure continuous progress.