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Journal of Northeast Texas Archaeology

DOI

https://doi.org/10.21112/.ita.2011.1.31

Abstract

The Pace McDonald site (41AN51) is a prehistoric Caddo mound center on Mound Prairie Creek in Anderson County, Texas, in the upper Neches River Basin. With the permission of one of the landowners, Mr. Johnny Sanford, the Friends of Northeast Texas Archaeology has initiated an archaeological research effort at the site in 2010, the first part of which was an April 2010 surface reconnaissance of the Sanford lands at the site, and the surface collection of artifacts exposed there following shallow disking of several tracts within the known boundaries of the site. This article discusses the character of the artifacts collected in the spring 2010 work.

The purpose of this work at the Pace McDonald site is to learn more about the native history of this mound center-when it was occupied and used, and by which prehistoric Caddo group-and its intra-site spatial organization. Ultimately, we hope to be able to obtain site-specific archaeological information that can help us to better understand the site's place and role in the Caddo prehistory of this part of East Texas.

The site is situated on a large and relatively flat upland landform (420-430 feet amsl) not far north of Mound Prairie Creek, in central Anderson County, Texas, in the East Texas Pineywoods. Mound Prairie Creek is a southward- and eastward-flowing tributary to the Neches River; the confluence of these two streams lies about 20 km to the east of the site. When the site was first visited and recorded in the 1930s, it was in a large cotton field. In more recent years, it is in an improved pasture, and the site is apparently owned by several landowners, including the Texas Historical Commission.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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