Location

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Twilight and Grand Ballrooms

Start Date

9-4-2013 4:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2013 8:00 PM

Description

Jack Dempsey cichlids, Rocio octofasciata, are native to South America and known for their aggressive behaviors. These fish are popular in freshwater aquariums, but can act aggressively towards other fish. In many species of fish individuals may behave aggressively to defend resources and the decision to defend these resources depends on factors such a habitat complexity (Oldfield 2011). Cichlids thus need ample room to maintain individual territories. Behavioral patterns in other species of cichlids have observed that the establishment of territories is constantly changing (Dijkstra et al. 2009). Individuals use information such as habitat complexity to adapt to environments, even if the environment is variable (Peake & McGregor 2004). Our hypothesis is that reducing habitat structures will increase aggression levels in confined Jack Dempsey cichlids.

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Apr 9th, 4:00 PM Apr 9th, 8:00 PM

Comparing Aggression Levels in Jack Dempsey Cichlids Based on Variation of Haitat Structure

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Twilight and Grand Ballrooms

Jack Dempsey cichlids, Rocio octofasciata, are native to South America and known for their aggressive behaviors. These fish are popular in freshwater aquariums, but can act aggressively towards other fish. In many species of fish individuals may behave aggressively to defend resources and the decision to defend these resources depends on factors such a habitat complexity (Oldfield 2011). Cichlids thus need ample room to maintain individual territories. Behavioral patterns in other species of cichlids have observed that the establishment of territories is constantly changing (Dijkstra et al. 2009). Individuals use information such as habitat complexity to adapt to environments, even if the environment is variable (Peake & McGregor 2004). Our hypothesis is that reducing habitat structures will increase aggression levels in confined Jack Dempsey cichlids.