Event Title

The Red Scare

Location

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Twilight and Grand Ballrooms

Start Date

10-4-2012 4:00 PM

End Date

10-4-2012 8:00 PM

Description

The Red Scare describes the time in American History following World War II when tension between Americans and other Communist countries, specifically the Soviet Union, were threateningly high. Each county was equipped for, yet fearful of an atomic war. The United States government tried to use this fear to motivate the American public to become mobilized. American citizens were encouraged to rely on themselves and prepare for the worst. Even though they were ignorant to the effects of such an attack, Americans tried desperately to prepare their homes and families. The government published articles, pamphlets, short films, and held drills in order to better prepare American citizens. Even though all of their attempts to ready citizens, the government kept information related to the severity of destruction caused by the very weapons they used on the opposing country. Feelings were strong and opinions were made known through Pop Culture. Citizens published their own songs and work, utilizing their freedom of speech. Later, many articles and information surfaced describing the effects of the Red Scare. It was not until much later that American citizens were aware of the possibly devastating threat they were so unprepared for.

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Apr 10th, 4:00 PM Apr 10th, 8:00 PM

The Red Scare

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Twilight and Grand Ballrooms

The Red Scare describes the time in American History following World War II when tension between Americans and other Communist countries, specifically the Soviet Union, were threateningly high. Each county was equipped for, yet fearful of an atomic war. The United States government tried to use this fear to motivate the American public to become mobilized. American citizens were encouraged to rely on themselves and prepare for the worst. Even though they were ignorant to the effects of such an attack, Americans tried desperately to prepare their homes and families. The government published articles, pamphlets, short films, and held drills in order to better prepare American citizens. Even though all of their attempts to ready citizens, the government kept information related to the severity of destruction caused by the very weapons they used on the opposing country. Feelings were strong and opinions were made known through Pop Culture. Citizens published their own songs and work, utilizing their freedom of speech. Later, many articles and information surfaced describing the effects of the Red Scare. It was not until much later that American citizens were aware of the possibly devastating threat they were so unprepared for.