Location

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Twilight and Grand Ballrooms

Start Date

31-3-2009 1:00 PM

End Date

31-3-2009 5:00 PM

Description

The opportunities for women to be placed in leadership positions are steadily increasing. With the rise in these positions and the fact that in many cases women are competing with men for the same leadership position, it is very important to understand how gender or other variables may affect who is chosen for such roles. Past research has shown that men are chosen much more frequently than women for leadership roles (Porter, Geis, & Jennings, 1983). The current study examined how additional variables may affect or interact with the selection of leaders of different genders.

Hebl(1995) found that characteristics of the task may influence which gender may be selected as the leader. Task-oriented competitive (tasks with the goal of competing and winning) and social cooperative (tasks with the goal of getting along and working together) tasks alter the frequency of females chosen to leadership roles. Socially cooperative tasks led to females being chosen more equally with males, whereas task-oriented competitive tasks supported previous research in that males were chosen significantly more frequently.

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Mar 31st, 1:00 PM Mar 31st, 5:00 PM

Gender,Social Facilitation, and Task Influences on Leadership Selection

Stephen F Austin State University, Baker Pattillo Student Center, Twilight and Grand Ballrooms

The opportunities for women to be placed in leadership positions are steadily increasing. With the rise in these positions and the fact that in many cases women are competing with men for the same leadership position, it is very important to understand how gender or other variables may affect who is chosen for such roles. Past research has shown that men are chosen much more frequently than women for leadership roles (Porter, Geis, & Jennings, 1983). The current study examined how additional variables may affect or interact with the selection of leaders of different genders.

Hebl(1995) found that characteristics of the task may influence which gender may be selected as the leader. Task-oriented competitive (tasks with the goal of competing and winning) and social cooperative (tasks with the goal of getting along and working together) tasks alter the frequency of females chosen to leadership roles. Socially cooperative tasks led to females being chosen more equally with males, whereas task-oriented competitive tasks supported previous research in that males were chosen significantly more frequently.